Current Honors Course Offerings

Body

 

 

Image
Autumn 2019 Honors Classes

NOTICE:  Below is a link to the live website that has current up-to-date course listings.  After hitting enter, choose the following criteria to obtain ASC Honors courses.   Click on the image below to go to the class search.   

Featured Classes for Autumn 2019 Semester:

 

Image
Dance 2367h

Dance

2367H: Honors Writing About Dance   Class#: 33261  Instructor: Prof. Karen Eliot    Tue/Thu 3:55PM - 5:15PM  Baker Systems 130

DESCRIPTION: Dance 2367H is an Honors 2nd Level Writing Course that affords students opportunities to learn about an array of diverse dance forms––from ballet to experimental, Bharat Natyam to tap, minimalist to Baroque. Students view, discuss, read, think and write about dance and its history while advancing their critical thinking, analytical and writing skills. Students watch dance on the screen, online, and in live performance venues. As a fundamentally non-verbal art form, dance is notoriously difficult to capture. Thus, learning to give language to the movement of bodies in time and space affords student widely transferable skills in observation and articulation. Class sessions involve viewing and discussing dance, reading models of dance criticism and scholarship, as well as sessions devoted to honing the practice of writing. No prior experience in dance is necessary. 

Economics

2001.03H: Principles of Microeconomics

Class#: 18571   Instructor: Prof. Dan Levin   Tue/Thu  9:35 am – 10:55 am  Evans Lab 2001

Class#: 18572   Instructor: Prof. William John White III  Wed/Fri   9:35 am – 10:55 am   McPherson Lab 1046

Class#: 18573   Instructor: Prof. Darcy Hartman   Tue/Thu   11:10 – 12:30 pm    Pomerene Hall 280

DESCRIPTION: An advanced introduction to economic theory: supply and demand for goods, services, and factor inputs; market structure; international trade, the distribution of income. First required course for students planning to take 4000-level courses in econ.  Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2001.01, 2001.02 (200), or 200H, and AEDEcon 2001 (200) or 2001H (200H). GE soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course.
 

2002.03H: Principles of Macroeconomics

Class#: 18571   Instructor: Prof. Ida Mirzaie  Tue/Thu  9:35 am – 10:55 am  Evans Lab 2001

Class#: 18572   Instructor: Prof. Darcy Hartman   Wed/Fri   9:35 am – 10:55 am   McPherson Lab 1046

Class#: 18573   Instructor: Prof. Ida Mirzaie  Tue/Thu   11:10 am – 12:30 pm    Pomerene Hall 280

DESCRIPTION: An advanced introduction to economic theory: supply and demand for goods, services, and factor inputs; market structure; international trade, the distribution of income. First required course for students planning to take 4000-level courses in econ.  Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2001.01, 2001.02 (200), or 200H, and AEDEcon 2001 (200) or 2001H (200H). GE soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course.
 

4960H: Honors Seminar in Economics  Class#: 33961  Instructor: Prof. Bruce Weinberg    Mon 12:10PM - 2:55PM  Caldwell Lab 183

DESCRIPTION: Prepares students to write an undergraduate thesis; group discussion of research problems, methods, and strategies.  Prereq: Honors standing, and 4001.01 (501.01), 4001.02 (501.02), or 4001.03, and 4002.01 (502.01), 4002.02 (502.02), or 4002.03; or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 596H.

 

English

2201H: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval through 1800  Class#: 34520   Instructor: Leslie Lockett   Wed/Fri 12:45PM - 2:05PM  Baker Systems 184

DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to some of the major British literary texts written from the early Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Milton's Paradise Lost and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. Our approach to the literature will emphasize close reading, form and genre, and historical context. Students will develop their research skills by means of a researched essay or creative project. Other requirements include three response papers and a final exam.    GE: Literature       GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare  Class#: 19018   Instructor: Sarah Neville   Tue/Thu 2:20PM - 3:40PM  Hayes Hall 025

DESCRIPTION: This class for honors students will approach a selection of Shakespeare's most and least-known plays through several methods, examining these works not only as historical artifacts rooted in the time and place of their creation, but also as spectacles that are best illuminated by live performance. In order to better enable us to consider the ways that staged properties and special effects are crucial parts of Shakespeare's stagecraft, this section of "Introduction to Shakespeare" is especially interested in the practical means through which Shakespeare's plays (and the earliest printed books they appeared in) resonate with both historical and contemporary audiences and readers. Through in-class exercises, field trips, and assignments in costuming, casting, producing and directing, we will seek to answer questions like:How was the English stage of 1592 different from a typical American stage of 2019?

How does a production pretend to cut someone's hands off?
How can two unrelated actors simulate playing twins?
What did Elizabethans think a medieval battle looked like?
How does a dead character returning as a ghost look differently from the way he did when he was alive?
What happens when a boy actor plays a female role? or a female actor plays a male one?
Who censored Shakespeare's plays, and why?
Class progress will be evaluated by research-based writing assignments, quizzes, a creative group project and a final exam.
GE: Literature   GE: Diversity (Global Studies)
 

2261H: Introduction to Fiction  Class#: 27429   Instructor: Jessica Prinz    Tue/Thu 3:55PM - 5:15PM  Denney Hall 245

DESCRIPTION:Examination of the elements of fiction—plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc.—and their various interrelations. Comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. GE: Literature

2280H: The English Bible—The Bible as Literature  Class#: 34756   Instructor: Hannibal Hamlin    Wed/Fri 12:45PM - 2:05PM  Denney Hall 207

DESCRIPTION:The Bible contains some of the weirdest and most wonderful literature you will ever read, and there is certainly no book that has had a greater influence on English and American literature from Beowulf to Paradise Lost, Pilgrim’s Progress to The Chronicles of Narnia, Whitman’s Song of Myself to Morrison’s Song of Solomon. We will read a selection of biblical books in order to gain some appreciation of the Bible’s wide range of literary genres, forms, styles and topics. Our discussion will include the nature of biblical narrative and characterization, the function of prophecy and its relation to history, the peculiar nature of biblical poetry, so-called Wisdom literature, anomalous books like Job and The Song of Songs (including the historical process of canonization that made them “biblical” and the kinds of interpretation that have been used to make them less strange), the relationship between (in traditional Christian terms) the Old and New Testaments (including typology, the symbolic linking of characters, events, themes, and images in the books before and after the Incarnation) and the unity (or lack thereof) of the Bible as a whole.

As occasion warrants, we will also look at some of the diverse ways the Bible has been read and interpreted––the stranger the better––by poets and writers, artists and film-makers over the past millennia.
 
Do note: this is NOT a course in religion, but rather an English course on the Bible as a literary work. Any and all faiths, or none, are welcome, and none will be privileged. 
 
Text: The English Bible: King James Version (2 vols.), ed. Herbert Marks (1) and Gerald Hammond and Austin Busch (2), Norton Critical Edition
Course requirements: Evaluation will be based on active participation in class discussion and activities, regular reading quizzes, two short essays, a mid-term test and a final exam.
GE: Literature
 

2367.01H: Language, Identity and Culture in the U.S. Experience  Class#: 25648  Instructor: Kay Halasek    Wed/Fri 2:20PM - 3:40PM  Denney Hall 207

DESCRIPTION: Working from historical artifacts the Ohio State University Archives, the digital archives of the Ohio State University Center for Folklore Studies and items in the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives, students will examine through material culture, historical archives, digital archives, and social media the various ways that students (in particular Ohio State University students) are represented (by others) and in turn represent themselves and their identities through their discourses, material culture(s), and social media presence and performances. Situated in and through the lenses of both contemporary and ancient rhetorical theory, the course introduces students to and asks them to join contemporary conversations investigating the intersections among rhetoric, language, identity and culture. Course assignments include (but are not limited to) archival artifact analyses and multimodal projects presented in Scalar.     GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)   GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

2367.02: Literature in the U.S. Experience 

Class#: 26557   Instructor: TBA    Wed/Fri 2:20PM - 3:40PM  McPherson Lab 1008 

Class#: 19035   Instructor: TBA    Tue/Thu 12:45PM - 2:05PM  Smith Lab 1042

DESCRIPTION: Discussion and practice of the conventions, practices and expectations of scholarly reading of literature and expository writing on issues relating to diversity within the U.S. experience.   GE: Literature  GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)  GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)

2367.05H: The U.S. Folk Experience  Class#: 34816 Instructor: Amy Shuman   Wed/Fri 11:10 am – 12:30 pm  Hayes Hall 012

DESCRIPTION: This course teaches students to listen, observe and write about what they learn using three different writing styles. We will spend time designing a project and deciding on a cultural site for students' listening and observing. The cultural site could be an artistic practice involving food, dance, music, etc. or a social/cultural practice involving a group students belong to. Students will have the opportunity to use three writing styles to describe the same cultural event or practice: an objective, third person paper; a confessional first person paper and a third paper in which students select the style most appropriate for their subject matter. We will work on revising and editing, and students will revise each of their papers and comment on other students' papers. For the final paper, students will be asked to write a paragraph explaining their stylistic choice.  GE: Diversity (Social Diversity in the U.S.)  GE: Writing & Communication (Level Two)

4590.04H: Romanticism  Class#: 34754 Instructor: Clare Simmons   Wed/Fri 12:45PM - 1:45 pm  Denney Hall 245

DESCRIPTION: The loose theme for this Honors Seminar on British literature of the Romantic period (roughly from the time of the French Revolution to the Victorian period) will be "Romanticism and the Visual." We will consider Romantic-era aesthetic theory (such as the role of imagination, the sublime and the picturesque) and the importance of the contemplation of the natural world. In combination with literary works, we will also view examples of Romantic visual art such as painting and architecture. Readings will include poetry by William Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, S.T. Coleridge, P.B. Shelley, John Keats, Mary Robinson, Felicia Hemans and Robert Burns; non-fiction prose by Edmund Burke, William Gilpin, Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas De Quincey; and the novels Frankenstein (Mary Shelley), The Bride of Lammermoor (Sir Walter Scott) and Northanger Abbey (Jane Austen).      Course Requirements: Regular attendance and participation; oral presentation; reading questions; short essay; final research paper project.    For more information contact Clare Simmons (simmons.9@osu.edu).

4590.08H: U.S. and Colonial Literature—Popular Literature and New Media  Class#: 34751 Instructor: Jared Gardner   Tue/Thu 2:20PM - 3:40PM  Denney Hall 202

DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the development of popular culture across media in the American 19th century, looking at novels, newspapers, story papers, illustrated magazines, dime novels and more, up to the rise of film and comics at century’s end. We will study the technological and cultural changes in print and other forms of communication and expression that shaped new possibilities during this period, and we will explore archives online and in special collections on campus to make new discoveries in the still largely untold story of the birth of a modern American popular culture..

Geography

1900H: Extreme Weather & Climate 

Class#: 28015   Instructor: Prof. Jialin Lin    Lecture:  Tue/Thu  11:10 am – 12:30 pm  Derby Hall 1116

Class#: 28016   Instructor: Prof. Jialin Lin    Lab: Tue  12:45 – 2:05 pm Derby Hall 070

DESCRIPTION: The primary objective of this course is to introduce you to the nature of the atmosphere and the processes by which it operates to produce weather and the distribution of the climates of the earth. As part of the course we will explain the physical processes acting in the earth-atmosphere system and describe its weather features and climatic characteristics. This will involve understanding concepts such as energy receipt, loss, and redistribution in the earth-atmosphere system as well as the understanding of the role of atmospheric moisture in energy exchange as well as cloud and precipitation formation.

3901H: Global Climate & Environmental Change   Class#: 19165   Instructor: ProfEllen Mosley-Thompson   Wed/Fri  9:35 am – 10:55 am    Derby Hall 1080

DESCRIPTION: The primary objective of this course is to introduce you to the nature of the atmosphere and the processes by which it operates to produce weather and the distribution of the climates of the earth. As part of the course we will explain the physical processes acting in the earth-atmosphere system and describe its weather features and climatic characteristics. This will involve understanding concepts such as energy receipt, loss, and redistribution in the earth-atmosphere system as well as the understanding of the role of atmospheric moisture in energy exchange as well as cloud and precipitation formation.

Top

German

Image
German 3254H

3254HRepresentations and Memory of the Holocaust in Film Class#: 32018   Instructor: Prof. Robert Holub    Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm  Hagerty Hall 351

DESCRIPTION: The Holocaust has been a tremendously important topic in postwar cinema.  There are major films in almost every major European country dealing with the Holocaust, directed by some of the foremost directors and featuring some of the greatest actors and actresses, and some of the most innovative filmic techniques. The Holocaust has been represented in various filmic forms: documentary, drama, comedy; indeed, there are probably more films on the Holocaust and more footage of the Holocaust placed in films than any other historical event outside of World War II. Yet the question of representation, in particular adequate representation is one that is continuously raised and debated.

In this course we will identify the complex interplay between history and filmic representation in connection with a major event of the twentieth century. Through examining films along with historical documents, as well as cultural and theoretical writings this course aims at teaching students how film as a unique art form deals with intricate historical phenomena and substantive issues of ethics. Taught in English.    Films will be screened outside of class. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts and GE Diversity-Global Studies course.

Top

History

2610H: Introduction to Women and Gender in the U.S. Class#: 28797   Instructor: Prof. Joan Flores    Tue/Thu 11:10 am - 12:30 pm  Enarson Classroom Bldg 218

DESCRIPTION:This honors course surveys the history of women and gender in the United States. The course will examine the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women within the contexts of historical change in the U.S. A major goal of the course is to present women's history both as an integral part of U.S. history and as a unique subject of historical investigation. What can be learned about other areas of American history—immigration, citizenship, racialization, formal politics—by examining women and gender? How does an examination of gender and women in history alter the historical questions we ask? Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments as well as to understand the difference that gender makes in history and the way that gender interacts with class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.  Students will gain hands-on experience visiting several different historical archives and museums on campus. Students will also do their own original historical research, utilizing a range of primary sources. We will practice a series of fundamental skills including critical thinking, analytical reading, accurate research, public speaking, and effective writing.

2800H: Introduction to the Discipline of History   Class#: 27648   Instructor: Prof. David Stebenne    Wed/Fri 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm  Enarson Classroom Bldg 238

DESCRIPTION:This course will introduce honors students planning to major in history to history as a discipline and a major.  The course is designed to give students practice in the analysis of historical sources and in developing logic and clarity in both written and oral assignments. Assignments include discussion of the assigned reading; three chapter summaries (précis); book review and oral presentation of the results; journal analysis and oral presentation of the results; history based on primary documents and oral presentation of the results. This course is required for all honors students majoring in history and highly recommended for honors students seeking a minor in history. Other honors students interested in history for its own sake and wanting a better sense of the field are also welcome.

Top

History of Art

Image
History of Art 3010H

3010H: Gender and Sexuality in Western Art Class#: 33827   Instructor: Prof. Karl Whittington    Tue/Thu 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm  Hagerty Hall 351

DESCRIPTION: This course explores the intersecting ideologies of gender and representation in Western art, particularly in Europe from the 12th-17th centuries. Throughout this period, both the status of art and the definitions of gender and sexuality were in a state of transition, and we will consider ways in which we as historians can understand the intermingling contexts of pictorial practice and gender construction. Topics to be explored include the ways in which historians can study and understand gender construction, the gendered contexts of artistic production, the gendered viewer and gaze, the changing status of female artists and patrons, and queer artists and artworks. Particularly, we will consider new manners of depicting men and, especially, women, to understand how pictorial imagery both describes and shapes cultural attitudes towards gender. In this context we will look at the depiction of the nude body, portraits of both ordinary and powerful men and women, art made by and for women, and images of sexual violence. In studying these historical contexts, as well as some modern works, it is hoped that we will also uncover the extent to which many of the same ideologies continue to operate within the methods and objects of both contemporary art historical study and contemporary global visual culture.

Top

International Studies

Image
International Studies 4320

[AEDECON] 4320E: Energy, Environment & the Economy  

Class#: 31428   Instructor: ProfBrent Sohngen    Lecture:  Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm   Journalism Building 251

Class#: 31429   Instructor: Prof.  Bruce Braine      Recitation:  Mon: 12:00pm – 1:20 pm   Smith Lab 2186

 

DESCRIPTION: Global climate change is one of the most important global environmental, economic, and policy issues of our time.  Even as the US Congress debates major legislation to address climate change, and the global community debates a successor treaty to the Kyoto Protocol, industries worldwide are voluntarily changing their business practices to account for their impact on the environment.   Green practices and greennhouse gas policies are among the most widely discussed issues today.  This course examines the many economic implications that climate change may have on society.  The course begins with a global view of the energy system, economic growth, and the potential impacts of climate change on major sectors such as agriculture, forests, water resources and coastal communities.  We then examine a wide range of business practices, technologies, and policies that may be used to combat climate change, and we assess the likely benefits and costs of the actions society may take. 

For additional information on this course, contact Professor Sohngen at Sohngen.1@osu.edu.  Prerequisite:  AED Econ 2001 or Econ 2001 or permission of the instructor.

 

Image
International Studies 5701E

[INTSTD]5701E: Advanced Intelligence  Class#: 28046   Instructor: Prof. Anita Bucknam    Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm  Campbell Hall - Room 335

DESCRIPTION: Today's US Intelligence Community faces many controversial issues while trying to deal with the multiple global threats that face the US.  In this class we will discuss, in depth, such issues as the role of Intelligence Community activities within the US; the appropriate level of legal constraints on intelligence activities; and the uses, and misuses, policymakers make of intelligence.  In addition to our full class activities, students will have multiple opportunities to work in small groups to discuss, and try to devise solutions for,  those issues, as well as for some of the global threats facing the US and US interests today, such as the rise of China, Russian expansionism, and conflict in the Middle East. Students will also get hands-on practice discussing and analyzing current events, and preparing their analysis for presentation to US policymakers, including the President. 

Prerequisite: International Studies 3700, or permission of instructor (bucknam.1@osu.edu).

Linguistics

2000H: Introduction to Language in the Humanities   Class #: 26288 Instructor: Prof. Björn Köhnlein TuTh 2:20 - 3:40p   Baker Systems 184

DESCRIPTION: This course examines language as a system of human communication. It also provides students with the tools needed for the recording, investigation, and close analysis of language. The course consists of a general survey of language and linguistics. A number of topics relating to man's knowledge and use of language are systematically investigated. Examples are drawn primarily from the English language, although other languages are used to illustrate certain concepts. Nevertheless, the focus of the course is not on any specific language or languages; rather, it is on properties common to all languages and on ways in which languages may differ. GE: Cultures and Ideas.
 

2052H: Theories of Linguistics: The Scientific Method for Abstractions and Unobservables   Class #: 33307  Instructor: Prof. Rebecca Morley  TuTh 2:20p - 3:40p   Lazenby 018

DESCRIPTION: Provides a strong grounding in fundamental principles of scientific reasoning illustrated through concrete examples across the Natural and Social Sciences with emphasis on Pyschology and Lingusitics. This course is suitable for students from all backgrounds including non-science majors. Students will gain understanding of what it means to "do science."    GE: Quantitative Reasoning - Math and Logical Analysis
 

Psychology

1100H – Introduction to Psychology 

Class#: 22654  Instructor: Staff  Mon/Wed/Fri  9:10AM - 10:05AM  Journalism Building 274

Class#: 26434  Instructor: Prof. Anna Yocom  Tue/Thu  11:10AM - 12:30PM  Enarson Classrom Bldg 018

Class#: 29164  Instructor: Prof. Kristy Boyce  Mon/Wed/Fri   11:30AM - 12:25PM  Jennings Hall 050

Class#: 29260  Instructor: Prof. James Todd  Tue/Thu  12:45PM - 2:05PM  Dreese Lab 317

Class#: 26838  Instructor: Prof. Lisa Miller  Mon/Wed/Fri   1:50PM - 2:45PM  Journalism Building 274

DESCRIPTION:  Psychology 100H is a comprehensive introduction to the science and profession of psychology.  Topics covered include the Biological Bases of Behavior and Cognition, Learning, Memory, Perception, Development, Cognition, Social Behavior and Clinical Psychology. Emphasis is placed upon recent psychological research and theory.  Course assignments include the textbook, readings in the psychological literature, a paper and either research participation or an original observational project. 

2220H - Introduction to Data Analysis   Class#: 27644   Instructor: Prof. Jolynn Pek   Tue/Thu  12:45 pm – 2:05 pm  Psychology Bldg 022

DESCRIPTION:  This course will cover the basic, traditional goals of developing an understanding of how and when to use various statistical methods. It will prepare you for advanced statistics courses like 3321H, Psychology 4998, or Honors Thesis work (4999H). However, in this course you will also have exposure to statistical computer programs, used for the analysis of actual data, the opportunity to learn deeper conceptual basics beyond mere calculation or memorization of formulae, and preparation for graduate study in psychology, where statistical knowledge is crucial. (Prereq = Stat 1450 or Math 1148)

3313H Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience   Class#: 25437   Instructor: Prof. Bennet Givens   Tue/Thu  11:10 am – 12:30 pm  Smith Lab 2006

DESCRIPTION:  This course explores the relationship between the brain, behavior and mental processes. The primary course objective is to learn the terminology and concepts that will form a basis for understanding how cognitive function and behavior arises from interactions between groups of neurons.  The course is divided into three sections.  The first section establishes principles relating to the general structure and function of the nervous system. The second section explores sensory and motor systems, with an in depth investigation of the visual system from retinal processes to complex perception.  The third section examines the neural basis for several domains of behavioral and cognitive functions and dysfunctions, from sleep, to emotions, to learning and memory, to neurological and psychological disorders. The course will also include discussions from contemporary readings and student presentations of experimental research articles.(Prereq = Psych 1100)

3325H - Introduction to Social Psychology     Class#: 22662   Instructor: Prof. Steven Spencer   Tue/Thu  3:55 pm – 5:15 pm  University Hall 086
DESCRIPTION:  This course examines the theories, research, and applications of social psychology.  The material is divided into four units:  (1) Social Perception – how we think about ourselves, other individuals, and groups;  (2) Social Influence – how we affect other people’s attitudes and behavior;  (3) Social Interaction – how we relate to each other as strangers, acquaintances, friends, and lovers; and  (4) Social Applications – the uses of social psychology to understand real-world problems in the areas of law, business, and health.  (Prereq = Psych 1100; Prohibited Course = Psych 2367.01)
 
3331H – Abnormal Psychology      Class#: 33646   Instructor: Prof. Daniel Strunk   Tue/Thu  9:35 am – 10:55 am  University Hall 086
DESCRIPTION:  This course focuses on the phenomenology (description), etiology (causes), and treatment of abnormal behavior.  Major psychiatric syndromes will be discussed along with our current classification system (DSM-V).  Genetic, biological, social, and psychological parameters implicated in the etiology of these syndromes will be reviewed. (Prereq = Psych 1100; Prohibited Course = Psych 2367.02)
 
3551H – Psychology of Adolescence     Class#: 33637   Instructor: Prof. Leslie Rudy   Tue/Thu  2:20 pm – 3:40 pm  Enarson Classrom Bldg 014
DESCRIPTION:  The purpose of this course is to examine theory and research on adolescent development.  Some of the specific areas covered include puberty and the teenage brain, risk-taking, identity and self-concept development, parent relations, peer pressure, media influences, sexual behavior, teenage pregnancy, adolescent depression, anti-social behavior, and drug and alcohol use.  The course is interdisciplinary in scope and should appeal to students not only in psychology, but also in other areas that focus on human behavior.  Course assignments include several short papers, a term paper, and an in-class presentation. (Prereq = Psych 1100)
 
 

Sociology

1101H: Introduction to Sociology

Class#: 23008   Instructor: Prof. Christopher Knoester   Wed/Fri  9:35AM - 10:55AM  Dreese Lab 317

Class#: 23010   Instructor: Prof. Korie Edwards   Wed/Fri  11:10AM - 12:30PM  Mendenhall Lab 125

Class#: 23009   Instructor: Prof. Kara Young   Mon/Wed  2:20PM - 3:40PM  Hayes Hall 025

DESCRIPTION:  A study of the art and profession of theatre, with an emphasis on evaluating and appreciating live performance, theatre's cultural importance, and its relationship to issues of social diversity. Students study performance conventions, texts, & spaces from ancient times to present day. While not an acting class, students get firsthand experience in the collaborative process of theatre creation. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 2100H or 2101H. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.
 

2367.01H:  The Political Elite and Interest Groups   Class#: 26906  Instructor:  Staff   Wed/Fri  12:45PM - 2:05PM   Dreese Lab 317

DESCRIPTION:  Sociological analysis of American politics and society, emphasizing political elites and interest groups, and the changing role of the state in the economy.  Prereq: Honors standing, and English 1110 (110), 1111, or 111, or equivalent; or permission of department or instructor. Not open to students with credit for 367.01H. GE writing and comm: level 2 and soc sci orgs and polities course.

3463H:  Social Stratification: Race, Class, and Gender   Class#: 28780  Instructor:  Staff   Tue/Thu  3:55PM - 5:15PM  Journalism Building 274

DESCRIPTION:  The study of social inequality with a focus on inequalities by class and status, race and ethnicity, and gender. Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of department or instructor. Not open to students with credit for 463H. GE soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course.

Spanish

3450H: Introduction to the Study of Literature and Culture in Spanish: Reading Texts  Class#: 23230  Instructor: Prof. Eugenia Romero, Prof. Trigo  WeFr 9:35AM - 10:55AM  Hagerty Hall 251 

DESCRIPTION:  This class serves as an introduction to the various issues involved in reading different types (genres) of literary and cultural texts in the Spanish language, and represents a crucial link between courses in language and culture and upper-level courses in literatures and cultures. Students will acquire the fundamental critical techniques needed for the analysis of literary and cultural texts, particularly narrative (short story and novel), poetry, drama, and film.  

4552H: Modern Spanish Literature   Class#: 33657  Instructor: Rebecca Haidt  WeFr 2:20PM - 3:40PM  Hagerty Hall 045

DESCRIPTION:  Introductory critical study of issues and processes in the formation of indigenous, colonial, and national expression through 19th century regional discourses. Prereq: Honors standing; and a grade of C- or above in 3450H; and GPA 3.4 or above. Not open to students with credit for 555E. FL Admis Cond course.

4555E: Indigenous, Colonial & National Literatures and Cultures of Spanish America   Class#: 33670  Instructor: Fernando Unzueta  Time: TBA  Room: TBA 

DESCRIPTION:  This course introduces students to rich and diverse literatures and cultures of Indigenous, Colonial, and 19th-Century or national Spanish America.  Pre-req: 3450.  Honors students registered in 4555E will have additional and/or longer (research) assignments.  Many or the readings for the class are considered “founding discourses.”  They include pre-Columbian indigenous works (in Spanish translation); selections of early European chronicles of Conquest and Discovery; local responses to those chronicles; Colonial discourses; and republican texts, including poetry, short stories, and a national novel. The course examines the socio-historical contexts of these texts, and how they contribute to the heterogeneous and changing Latin American identities. It promotes the development of critical thinking and skills through in-class discussion and written analysis of the texts.

4560H: Indigenous, Colonial & National Literatures and Cultures of Spanish America   Class#: 33854  Instructor: Paloma Martinez-Cruz  TuTh 12:45PM - 2:05PM  Hagerty Hall 062

DESCRIPTION:  Major elements in the culture of the peoples of Spanish America. Prereq: Honors standing; and a grade of C- or above in 3450H; and GPA 3.4 or above. Not open to students with credit for 560 or 560H. FL Admis Cond course.

 
Theatre

2100H: Introduction to Theatre 

Class#: 23601   Instructor: Prof. Lesley Ferris   Tue/Thu  12:45 pm – 2:05 pm  Evans Lab 2068

Class#: 23654   Instructor:  TBA   Wed/Fri   9:35 am – 10:55 am   Evans Lab  2001

Class#: 24212   Instructor:  TBA   Wed/Fri    11:10 – 12:30 pm      PAES A103

DESCRIPTION:  A study of the art and profession of theatre, with an emphasis on evaluating and appreciating live performance, theatre's cultural importance, and its relationship to issues of social diversity. Students study performance conventions, texts, & spaces from ancient times to present day. While not an acting class, students get firsthand experience in the collaborative process of theatre creation. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 2100H or 2101H. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.