Current Honors Course Offerings

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NOTICE:  Click here to see current up-to-date course listings.  After hitting enter, choose the following criteria to obtain ASC Honors courses.   Click on the image below to go to the class search.   

Autumn 2020 Honors Class Filter

Featured Classes for Autumn 2020 Semester:

 

Anthropology

2201H: Honors Introduction Archaeology

Class: 20406  Time: Mon/Wed 1:10 am - 12:30 pm  Location: Smith Laboratory - Room: 4025  Instructor: Kristen Jody Gremillion

DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to the the aims and methods of archaeology through examining the human past on a global scale. Of all disciplines, archaeology is uniquely situated to discover the human past throughout millions of years of prehistory. This course will help students understand both how archaeologists learn about the past, and how that knowledge can be applied to understand the human condition in the present. What heritage do we share with other animals, and how are we different? How have humans adapted to the Earth’s diverse natural environments, and why do societies sometimes fail to prosper? Why do cultures change over time? The prehistoric record of human lifeways give us insight into some of the issues that face us in the contemporary world, such as war and violence, environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, climate change, hunger, social inequality, migration, and cultural conflict. This course explores these issues by examining a selection of important archaeological sites in various parts of the world. Requirements include:  online quizzes, reading responses, discussion posts, final project, attendance. Satisfies: Social Science/Individuals and Groups and Diversity/Global Studies GE requirements.   

Art

2100E: Beginning Drawing

Class: 12615 Time: Tue/Thu 8:10 am – 10:55 am Location: Hayes Hall – Room 302 Instructor: TBA

3555H: Introduction to Digital Photography and Contemporary Issues

Class: 34741 Time: Tue/Thu 11:10 am – 1:55 pm Location: Hopkins Hall – Room 262 Instructor: Gina Osterloh

 

Classics

1101H: Honors Introduction to Classical Literature

Class: 21901  Time: Tue/Thu 11:10 am - 12:30 pm  Location: Smith Laboratory - Room: 2006  Instructor: Benjamin Acosta-Hughes

DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the Greek and Roman achievement in literature and its contribution to Western thought; selected readings in English translation in major authors from Homer to Boethius.  

2201H: Honors Classical Civilization Greece

Class: 21902  Time: Tue/Thu2:20 pm - 3:40 pm Location: Enarson Classroom Building - Room: 226  Instructor: Anthony Kaldellis

DESCRIPTION: A survey of ancient Greek civilization, concentrating upon important facets of literature, history, art, and archaeology.

2202H: Honors Classical Civilization Rome

Class: 21903  Time: Mon/Wed/Fri 12:40 pm - 1:35 pm  Location: Journalism Building - Room: 274  Instructor: TBA

DESCRIPTION: A survey of the civilization of  ancient Rome, concentrating upon important facets of literature, history, art, and archaeology.

2220H: Honors Classical Mythology

Class: 14110  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35 am - 10:55 am  Location: Bolz Hall - Room: 318  Instructor: TBA

DESCRIPTION: Personalities and attributes of the Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, their mythology and its influence on Western culture. 

 

Comparative Studies

2350H: Intro to Folklore 

Class: 33841  Time: Wed/Fri 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm  Location: Enarson Classroom Building - Room: 214  Instructor: Katherine M Borland

DESCRIPTION: This class explores forms of traditional, vernacular culture—including verbal art, custom, and material culture—shared by people from a number of regional, ethnic, religious, and occupational groups. We will consider various interpretive, theoretical approaches to examples of folklore and folklife, and we will investigate the history of folklore studies. Recurring central issues will include the dynamics of tradition, the nature of creativity and artistic expression, and the construction of group identities. Folklore theory and methods will be explored through readings and an independent collecting project, where students will gather folklore from their home town or the college campus. Students will interview people for stories and other oral forms, and will document cultural practices through photographs, drawings and fieldnotes. Final collecting projects will be accessioned in the Student Ethnographic Collection at the Center for Folklore Studies Archives. Make your mark documenting the expressive culture you know most intimately and that you value most, and expand the consultable record of human experience. GE Cultures and Ideas. Honors version. Cross-listed in English 2270H.

3302E: Translating Literature and Cultures

Class: 14390  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35 am - 10:55 am  Location: Mendenhall Laboratory - Room: 174  Instructor: Gregory Jusdanis

DESCRIPTION: Introduction to issues and problems inherent to translating literatures and cultures.  Prereq: Honors standing, and English 1110 (110), or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 3302 (373) or 373E. GE Cultures and Ideas and Diversity: Global Studies. Embedded honors version. 

 

Earth Sciences

2122H: Climate and Life over Billions of Years on Earth

Lecture Class: 25009  Time: M/W/F 12:40 pm - 1:35 pm  Location: Mendenhall Laboratory - Room: 251  Instructor: Michael Barton

Lab Class: 25010  Time: Mon  1:50 pm - 3:40 pm  Location: Mendenhall Laboratory - Room: 252  Instructor: Michael Barton

DESCRIPTION: We will examine the basic principles and methods of the modern historical earth sciences, including sedimentary rocks and their importance as records of earth history, relative age determination, absolute age determination, fossils and fossilization, stratigraphy, evolution, and controls on global climate change. We will also examine the basic facts and theories of modern historical earth sciences, including origin of the earth and solar system, and history of the earth and life on earth during the Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic periods.

 

English

2201H: Selected Works of British Literature: Medieval through 1800

Class: 25988  Time: Wed/Fri 9:35 am - 10:55 am Location: Denney Hall - Room: 207  Instructor: David A Brewer

DESCRIPTION: This course will offer an introduction to the most exciting and memorable literature written in English prior to 1800, which is to say, prior to the invention of most of our standard ideas about literature. We will use the often unusual and provocative perspectives opened up by our engagement with this material both to think about how it worked in its own time and how it has shaped the world we now inhabit. In so doing, we will focus both upon the words themselves and the physical objects through which they have come down to us, drawing extensively on the holdings of our Rare Books and Manuscripts Library. Likely readings include portions of The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Paradise Lost, Evelina, several darkly comic plays, and some of the most moving poetry ever written. Course requirements will include a weekly reading journal, several short written exercises, and active participation in both our discussions and our work with the collections of Rare Books. This course is open to non-honors students who are interested in deeply engaging with this literature and how it continues to work in the world.

2202H: Selected Works of British Literature: 1800 to Present

Class: 34846  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm Location: Denney Hall - Room: 202  Instructor: Jill Nicole Galvan

DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce you to major British literary trends of the last two centuries. Class meetings will include both lecture and lots of discussion. Our texts will cover the Romantic, Victorian, modern, and postcolonial periods, as well a bit of the twenty first-century. We'll talk about many major forms and movements - for example, the lyric, the Gothic, the dramatic monologue, aestheticism, the Bildungsroman, and modernism. We'll also cover the cultural and historical phenomena that inform our texts, including the French Revolution, slavery and abolitionism, industrialization, imperialism, debates over gender roles, the rise of scientific values, the two world wars, and decolonization. Finally, besides teaching you literary and cultural history, English 2202H will help you to become a better critical reader and literary analyst, either for future classes or for your own enjoyment. You'll practice reading texts with an eye for fine detail (a.k.a. close-reading or explicating) in order to construct logical, complex interpretations based on textual evidence. Some of our authors (tentative): William Blake, Mary Kingsley, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Keats, Christina Rossetti, Charlotte Bronte, Olive Schreiner, Oscar Wilde, Wilfred Owen, Virginia Woolf, Una Marson, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, and Kazuo Ishiguro. Graded requirements (also tentative): regular and enthusiastic participation, three or four short response papers (1-2 pp. each), a term paper (5-7 pp.) and two exams.

2220H: Introduction to Shakespeare

Class: 34845  Time: Wed/Fri 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm Location: Derby Hall - Room: 062  Instructor: Jennifer K Higginbotham

DESCRIPTION: In late sixteenth-century London, on the south bank of the Thames, amongst bear-baiting rings and brothels stood a round wooden theater that brought together people from all walks of life - aristocrats and merchants, cobblers and tailors, seamstresses and fishwives. It was for this space and for these people that William Shakespeare first wrote his influential plays, and in this course, we'll be imagining what it was like to stand with them and watch Shakespeare's theater in action. This particular honors section of Introduction to Shakespeare will be experimenting with cutting edge techniques for facilitating embodied learning through the combination of rehearsal room techniques modeled on professional theater companies with close textual analysis of Shakespeare's language. Our in-depth exploration will include selected comedies and tragedies, a few poems, and a lot of fun along the way.

2261H: Introduction to Fiction

Class: 23818  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm Location: Hagerty Hall - Room: 259  Instructor: Jennifer Willging

DESCRIPTION: Examination of the elements of fiction -- plot, character, setting, narrative, perspective, theme, etc. -- and their various interrelations; comparisons with nonfictional narrative may be included. Prereq: Honors standing, and 1110.01 (110.01) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 2261 (261) or 261H. GE lit course.

2270H: Introduction to Folklore

Class: 33851  Time: Wed/Fri 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm Location: Enarson Classroom Building - Room: 214  Instructor: Katherine M Borland

DESCRIPTION:  This class explores forms of traditional, vernacular culture - including verbal art, custom, and material culture - shared by people from a number of regional, ethnic, religious, and occupational groups. We will consider various interpretive, theoretical approaches to examples of folklore and folklife, and we will investigate the history of folklore studies. Recurring central issues will include the dynamics of tradition, the nature of creativity and artistic expression, and the construction of group identities. Folklore theory and methods will be explored through readings and an independent collecting project, where students will gather folklore from their home town or the college campus.  Students will interview people for stories and other oral forms, and will document cultural practices through photographs, drawings and fieldnotes. Final collecting projects will be accessioned in the Student Ethnographic Collection at the Center for Folklore Studies Archives. Make your mark documenting the expressive culture you know most intimately and that you value most and expand the consultable record of human experience.    Cross-listed as Comparative Studies 2350H.

4590.03H: The Long Eighteenth Century

Class: 34843  Time: Tue/Thu 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm Location: Denney Hall - Room: 207  Instructor: Roxann Wheeler

DESCRIPTION:  An intensive study of major British authors and works 1660-1820, their role in literary history, and the theory/criticism that illuminates them.  Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 590.03H.

4590.07H: Literature in English after 1945

Class: 34758 Time: Wed/Fri 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm Location: Denney Hall - Room: 213  Instructor: Jessica Prinz

DESCRIPTION:  Intensive study of literature in English after 1945.   Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 590.07H.

 

French

2201.01H: Honors Introduction to French and Francophone Studies

Class: 23818  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm Location: Hagerty Hall - Room: 259  Instructor: Jennifer Willging

DESCRIPTION: Welcome to the threshold to the French minor and major! In French 2101.01H, you will have the opportunity to practice and improve your reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills in French, as well as to continue learning about French and Francophone literatures and cultures through reading, viewing, and interpreting authentic literary and visual texts from around the Francophone world. The multiple advantages of taking the Honors section of this course include:

  • Smaller class size (maximum enrollment is 20 students)
  • More in-depth discussions of the questions and problems raised in the texts we will read and watch
  • More practice speaking French
  • More opportunities to get to know your classmates
  • Instruction by a tenure-track faculty member, who can then serve as an advisor, mentor, and letter of recommendation writer for you as you progress through your studies

Don’t miss this chance to reach your goals in French and Francophone Studies more quickly and while having more fun than  you had hoped!

Don’t hesitate to contact the instructor, Prof. Jennifer Willging (willging.1), if you have any questions about the course. À l’autumne prochain.

Geography

3901H: Global Climate an Environmental Change

Class: 15659  Time: Wed/Fri 9:35 am - 10:55 am  Location: Derby Hall - Room: 1080  Instructor: Ellen Mosley Thompson

DESCRIPTION: Examines both natural and social factors that force changes in our climate and environment and explores strategies for a sustainable environment in the future. Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 3900 (420) or 410H. GE nat sci phys and soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course. Credit Hours: 3.0

 

German

3254H: Representations and Memory of the Holocaust in Film

Class: 24704  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm  Location: Hagerty Hall - Room: 351  Instructor: Robert Charles Holub

DESCRIPTION:  The Holocaust has been a tremendously important topic in postwar cinema.  There are major films in almost every major European country dealing with the Holocaust, directed by some of the foremost directors and featuring some of the greatest actors and actresses, and some of the most innovative filmic techniques. The Holocaust has been represented in various filmic forms:
documentary, drama, comedy; indeed, there are probably more films on the Holocaust and more footage of the Holocaust placed in films than any other historical event outside of World War II. Yet the question of representation, in particular adequate representation is one that is continuously raised and debated.

In this course we will identify the complex interplay between history and filmic representation in connection with a major event of the twentieth century. Through examining films along with historical documents, as well as cultural and theoretical writings this course aims at teaching students how film as a unique art form deals with intricate historical phenomena and substantive issues of ethics.

Films will be screened outside of class. Taught in English. GE Visual and Performing Arts and GE Diversity-Global Studies course.

3353H: German Intellectual History: Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud

Class: 33808  Time: Tue/Thu 12:45 pm - 2:05 pm  Location: Campbell Hall - Room: 119  Instructor: Paul Reitter

DESCRIPTION:  Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud are essential for understanding intellectual thought in the late nineteenth and twentieth century. They have retained their importance into the twenty-first century. The focus of the course will be the way in which Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud reconceived the notion of history, historical progress, and historiography.

Taught in English. GE cultures and ideas course.

 

History

3901H: Slavery in the Ancient World

Class: 33701  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35 am - 10:55 am  Location: Denney Hall - Room: 262  Instructor: James Albert Harrill

DESCRIPTION: This course examines slavery as an institution and an ideology of classical Greece and Rome, including its importance in the ancient family, economy, and culture.  Why did the massive slave revolt by the Roman gladiator Spartacus in Italy give rise to a modern legend?  How did ancient thinking about slaves reflect what the master class saw in themselves?  Was the legal institution ever questioned as immoral, esp. in the Bible?  How do we write a history of ancient slavery when the surviving primary evidence reflects the views of masters, not slaves?  Such questions inspire the goals of this course to uncover the disturbingly unseen and invisible ways that slavery in classical antiquity has left its mark on Western culture.

GE History / Culture & Ideas Course.  History Geographic Area: Europe (pre-1750).  Constellations: History of race, ethnicity, and nation / Religious history

4015H: Honors Seminar in History: The “Fifties”: Life in the United States, 1948-1963

Class: 33751  Time: Mon 9:35 am - 12:20 pm  Location: Denney Hall - Room: 268  Instructor: David Lawler Stebenne

DESCRIPTION: An examination of American life during the immediate post-World-War-II period.  Emphasis on the creation of a large military establishment and collective security agreements such as NATO, Cold War conflicts (most notably in Korea) and the U.S.-Soviet arms race, moderate (Eisenhower-era) conservatism, mass suburbanization, the baby boom, the re-emphasis on domesticity for women, the advent of television, the revival of mainstream religion, the Beats and other dissenters against the Fifties’ system, and the other forces (economic, political, social and cultural) that eventually undermined the stability of the Fifties’ system, such as superpower confrontations in the Third World, environmental pollution and the increasing challenge to segregation in law and everyday life.

Assigned readings:  Weekly reading assignments delve into the above topics in depth; approximately 125-150 pages per week.

Assignments:  Attendance at, and lively participation in, all class meetings; a 3-5-page research paper prospectus; and a first draft and a final draft of a 20 page research paper.

Prerequisites and Special Comments:  History 3015 recommended.  This course fulfills a GE requirement.

 

Linguistics

3701H: Language and the Mind

Class: 33973  Time: Mon/Wed 3:55pm-5:15pm  Location: Enarson Classroom Building - Room: 214  Instructor: Chun Zheng

DESCRIPTION: The course is an introduction to the psychological processes by which humans produce and understand sentences in conversation, the means by which these processes arise in the child, and their bases in the brain. It deals with the following topics (among others): (1) Speech Perception, the process of detecting distinct 'sounds' in speech signals; (2) Lexical Access, the process of 'looking up' words in a mental dictionary; (3) Syntactic Parsing, the process of discovering the structure of sentences; (4) Semantic Interpretation, the process of using syntactic structures, word meaning and general world knowledge to interpret what we hear; (5) Language Acquisition, the process by which a child becomes able to produce and understand sentences of his or her native language(s), (f) Neurolinguistics, the study of the way language functions are implemented in the brain.

GE: Social Science: Individuals and Groups. Cross-listed as Psych 3371.

 

Math

1181H: Honors Calculus I   See class search for lecture and recitation information.

1187H: Honors Problem Solving  See class search for lecture and recitation information.

2568H: Honors Linear Algebra  See class search for lecture and recitation information.

4181H: Honors Analysis I  See class search for lecture and recitation information.

5520H: Honors Linear Algebra and Differential Equations  See class search for lecture and recitation information.

5529H: Honors Combinatorics  See class search for lecture and recitation information.

5590H: Honors Abstract Algebra I  See class search for lecture and recitation information.

 

Religious Studies

3872H: Varieties of Christianity

Class: 26244  Time: Wed/Fri 2:20 pm - 3:40 pm  Location: Enarson Classroom Building - Room: 214  Instructor: Spencer L Dew

DESCRIPTION: Explores various expressions of Christianity, historically and cross-culturally. Readings are from different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, religious studies, and sociology. Prereq: Honors standing. Not open to students with credit for 4872H (524H).

 

Womens Gender and Sexuality Studies

1110H: Gender, Sex & Power

Class: 34293  Time: Wed/Fri 9:35 am - 10:55 am  Location: Hopkins Hall - Room: 246  Instructor: Guisela Latorre

DESCRIPTION: This course offers a critical introduction to the field known as women’s, gender and sexuality studies (WGSS). The class is designed to provide a basic understanding of  WGSS for students from diverse backgrounds and academic majors. Though the class will pay particular attention to the lives and experiences of women and LGBTQ+ populations, we will also focus on how gender shapes everyone’s lives. We all live in a gendered society! We will address key questions and ideas that come from WGSS: What is a feminist? What is gender? Can we imagine a world free of gender oppression/discrimination? Moreover, we will explore how gender intersects with other social categories such as race, sexuality, class, ability/disability, etc.

2750H: Natives & Newcomers – Immigration & Migration in US History

Class: 35216 Time: Wed/Fri 11:10 am - 12:30 pm  Location: Cockins Hall - Room: 232  Instructor: Suparna Bhaskaran

DESCRIPTION: US migration and immigration history is varied, contested, nuanced, and complicated. This course seeks to provide historical context to current debates about belonging, citizenship, xenophobia, racial formation, nativism, and border policing.  Cross-listed in History.