Current Honors Course Offerings

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NOTICE:  Click here to see current up-to-date course listings.  After hitting enter, choose the following criteria to obtain ASC Honors courses.   Click on the image below to go to the class search.   

Featured Classes for Spring 2020 Semester:

Art

3555H: Introduction to Photography

Class: 33671  Time: Tue/Thu 3:55PM - 4:55PM  Location: 262 Hopkins Hall  Instructor: Gina Osterloh

DESCRIPTION: Art 3555 Honors: Introduction to Photography is an introductory photography class exploring photographic practice, aesthetics, history, and theory. This course will emphasize seeing, thinking, and creating with a critical and curious mind/eye in order to understand the construction and manipulation of photographic meaning and form. Students will explore how one’s way of seeing is deeply tied to one’s personal and cultural experience, and learn about issues of representation via images. This course utilizes digital cameras for image production and prints for assignments to be made through local stores.

Presentation of assignments will follow various critique formats. In class lectures will introduce the work of photographers and the evolution of aesthetics and theory associated with the history of the medium. Lectures, videos, readings, and projects facilitate the goals and learning outcomes for this GE course (see next section).

Art 3555 Honors and Art 3555 requires that students have their own digital camera with full or partial manual functions. The class currently does not teach digital post production, but the professor will introduce Lightroom and Photoshop for those that wish to use these programs. OSU has several free and open labs with the full Adobe Suite for all students to use.

Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2555H. GE VPA course.

Economics

2001.03H: Principles of Microeconomics

Class: 18250  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM - 3:40PM  Location: 1035 McPherson  Instructor: Ethan Doetsch

Class: 18251  Time: Wed/Fri 12:45PM - 2:05PM  Location: 218 Cockins  Instructor: Senad Sinanovic

DESCRIPTION: An advanced introduction to economic theory: supply and demand for goods, services, and factor inputs; market structure; international trade, the distribution of income. First required course for students planning to take 4000-level courses in econ.  Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2001.01, 2001.02 (200), or 200H, and AEDEcon 2001 (200) or 2001H (200H). GE soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course.

2002.03H: Principles of Macroeconomics

Class: 18252  Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM - 2:05PM  Location: N050 Scott Lab   Instructor: William White

Class: 29035  Time: Mon/Wed 11:10AM - 12:30PM  Location: 100 Campbell Hall   Instructor: Darcy Hartman

DESCRIPTION: An advanced introduction to economic theory: supply and demand for goods, services, and factor inputs; market structure; international trade, the distribution of income. First required course for students planning to take 4000-level courses in econ.  Prereq: Honors standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 2001.01, 2001.02 (200), or 200H, and AEDEcon 2001 (200) or 2001H (200H). GE soc sci human, nat, and econ resources course.

English

2201H: Selected Works of British Literature—Medieval through 1800

Class: 33532  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35AM-10:55AM  Location: 209 Denney Hall  Instructor: Leslie Lockett

DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to some of the major British literary texts written from the early Middle Ages through the late eighteenth century, including Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Milton's Paradise Lost and Aphra Behn's Oroonoko. Our approach to the literature will emphasize close reading, form and genre, and historical context. Students will develop their research skills by means of a researched essay or creative project. Other requirements include three response papers and a final exam.    GE: Literature       GE: Diversity (Global Studies)

2202H: Selected Works of British Literature—1800 to Present

Class: 33534  Time: Wed/Fri 3:55PM-5:15PM  Location: 209 Denney Hall  Instructor: Jacob Risinger

DESCRIPTION: A great grand tour of British Literature from the Napoleonic Wars to Brexit, with a special emphasis on the collision of history and literary form.

2220H: Honors Introduction to Shakespeare

Class: 25633  Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM  Location: 209 Denney Hall  Instructor: Luke Wilson

DESCRIPTION: TBA

2260H: Honors Introduction to Poetry

Class: 25905  Time: Wed/Fri 12:45PM-2:05PM  Location: 209 Denney Hall  Instructor: Jill Galvan

DESCRIPTION: TBA

4590.02H: The Renaissance: Mixed Media Before the Modern. Hannibal Hamlin   

Class: 28806  Time: Tue/Thu 11:10AM-12:30PM  Location: 268 Denney Hall  Instructor: Hannibal Hamlin

DESCRIPTION: Mixing media was a thing long before the digital age. Renaissance writers, artists, and musicians didn’t need cameras, video, recording, and the web to produce exciting works of art that delighted both the eye and the ear, that blended words and music, poetry and images, print and pictures, and performances that added to all this dance, costume, spectacle, stage machinery, and even the court or cityscape itself. This course will explore the inventive mixed media of the Renaissance, including songs of all sorts (ballads, ayres, street cries, hymns), emblems (a riddling blend of poetry, symbolic images, cryptic mottoes, and quotations), proto-graphic-novel-type combinations of art and text, the lavish performance-art extravaganzas of the court masque, and the too-often-neglected multiple media of popular plays. Especially in his late plays, Shakespeare included dancing, singing, instrumental music, visual images, and arresting stage mechanics. Works will include songs by John Dowland, Thomas Campion, and Henry Lawes, emblems by Geoffrey Whitney, Francis Quarles, and George Wither, the remarkable cut-and-paste illustrated Bibles of the Ferrar women of Little Gidding, the court masques of Ben Jonson (poet), Alfonso Ferrabosco (composer), and Inigo Jones (designer and architect), and Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale. We’ll consider what happens when different media are combined into a single synaesthetic experience, and we may also think about the challenges of preserving, recapturing, studying, and appreciating these works in the twenty-first century. Students with an interest in music, painting, design and other areas.

English 4590.03H: Honors Seminar on The Long Eighteenth Century

Class: 33554  Time: Wed/Fri 12:45PM-2:05PM  Location: 207 Denney Hall  Instructor: David Brewer

This course will investigate the invention of celebrity (and celebrities) over the course of the eighteenth century. Fame has been around since antiquity; celebrity began sometime between 1660 and 1820. In so doing, we'll gain some new vantage points from which to assess our own culture of celebrity. Course requirements include active participation in our discussions, two short research exercises (one of which will involve material from our Rare Books Library), a polished presentation on a current celebrity, and a final project in a form of your choice.

4591.01H: Special Topics Honors Seminar in Creative Writing: Retellings and Responses

Class: 28591  Time: Wed 12:40PM-3:40PM  Location: 368 Denney Hall  Instructor: Michelle Herman

DESCRIPTION: In this course, we'll look at retellings and reimaginings of fairy tale and bible stories, beloved children’s stories, Shakespeare’s plays and Chekhov’s stories, and other works of literature—along with fiction about real people that “retells” their lives--which we will read alongside the material that inspired them. And then you will make your own short retelling in the genre of your choice. Final projects will be longer retellings of a work you choose yourself—one we have not looked at in the course. For more information, contact Professor Michelle Herman at herman.2@osu.edu or stop in to see her in Denney Hall 468 any Wednesday this autumn between 10:30 AM and 12:30 PM (or email her for an appointment at a more convenient time). If you are an honors student who has taken English 2265, 2266, 2267, or 2268, you will not need Professor Herman’s permission to register for the course. All others are invited—but please be prepared to show/send Professor Herman a sample of work you have produced in your discipline. Honors standing is not necessary.

4591.02H: Communicating about/with Illness and Disability

Class: 33580  Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM  Location: 312 Denney Hall  Instructor: Margaret Price

DESCRIPTION: We spend each day in a flood of communication about illness and disability (and related ideas, including “health,” “wellness,” and “self-care”). In the United States, we spend almost $10,000 per person per year on health care, while also being bombarded with information about the “Campus Mental Health Crisis.” Buzzfeed videos show us the latest stair-climbing wheelchair; Twitter debates Serena Williams’s choice of athletic attire; and Facebook is filled with requests to donate to GoFundMe for a person whose life-saving surgery has left them bankrupt. We, as writers and readers, are both the authors and the audience of all this information. The purpose of this course is to offer you a chance to think through and discuss these complicated discourses—what they say, how they circulate, what cultural stories they unearth, and ultimately what they mean for you and your own understanding of health and illness.

German

2310H: Nature in Nordic and Germanic Literatures

Class: 33580  Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM  Location: 312 Denney Hall  Instructor: Margaret Price

DESCRIPTION: This course explores how literature and culture––including, among others, traditional art forms, popular culture, folklore, lifestyle, social customs, and political culture––are deeply intertwined with our relationship toward nature and our natural and cultural environments, including forests, oceans, mountains, parks, and rural and urban spaces. At the center of this exploration are the history and culture of the Nordic and German-speaking countries (Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Switzerland, Austria, and Germany), from the medieval period to the present, and their interrelationships. The rich and diverse literatures and cultures of these countries can help explain their strong environmental performance today, as well as their intense engagement with current global environmental issues, from climate change and biodiversity loss to ocean acidification and soil erosion.

Representations and concepts of nature will be explored in a variety of literary genres: medieval sagas; Gothic Romantic tales; 19th-century fairy tales (e.g., “Snow Queen” that inspired Disney’s Frozen); the modernist novel; graphic novel; poetry; essay; and science-fiction, both dystopian and utopian; and series. Topics include the cultivation of Iceland; the landscape of war; witchcraft and the magic of nature; urbanization and the destruction of nature; back-to-nature movements; the fascist instrumentalization of nature; nature and memory; the reality and imagination of nuclear disaster and pollution; the philosophy of Deep Ecology; dystopia and utopia in the age of climate change and fears of irreversible environmental damage.

All readings available in English; taught in English.
Cross-listed as Scandvn 2310.

Hebrew

2700H: The Hebrew Bible in Translation

Class: 26010  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35AM-10:55AM   Location: 2186 Smith Lab  Instructor: Daniel Frank

DESCRIPTION: Creation, expulsion, procreation, murder, natural disaster  — the opening chapters of the Bible tell a tale of universal origins. The narratives that follow relate the story of a chosen individual, then a family, and finally a people. This course introduces the narratives of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) from Genesis through Kings. The stories will be studied from a critical perspective, within their Ancient Near Eastern contexts — social, cultural, and religious. We will also examine the special literary features that make biblical prose so distinctive. Finally, we will look at the ways in which certain stories were understood by later generations.

Fulfills GE Requirements: Literature & Diversity. Global Studies

Prerequisites: None 

History

2800H: Introduction to the Discipline of History 

Class: 26460  Time: We/Fri 11:10AM-12:30PM   Location: 066 University Hall  Instructor: Stephen Kern

DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce honors students planning to major in history to history as a discipline and a major.  The course is designed to give students practice in the analysis of historical sources and in developing logic and clarity in both written and oral assignments. Assignments include discussion of the assigned reading; three chapter summaries (précis); book review and oral presentation of the results; journal analysis and oral presentation of the results; history based on primary documents and oral presentation of the results. This course is required for all honors students majoring in history and highly recommended for honors students seeking a minor in history. Other honors students interested in history for its own sake and wanting a better sense of the field are also welcome.

4015H: Honors Seminar in Modern U.S. History

Class: 32320  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35AM-12:20PM   Location: 202 Denney Hall  Instructor: David Stebenne

DESCRIPTION: Advanced research and readings on selected topics in Modern U.S. History. Prereq or concur: Honors standing, English 1110.xx, a grade of C or above in History 2800, and any 3000-level History course; or permission of instructor.

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History of Art

2001H: Western Art I: Ancient and Medieval Worlds 

Class: 33071  Time: We/Fri 9:35AM-10:55AM   Location: TBA  Instructor: Mark Fullerton

DESCRIPTION: Examination of the history of Western Art from the third millennium BCE to the fifteenth century CE. Prereq: Honors standing, or by permission of dept or instructor. Not open to students with credit for 201, 201H, 210, or 210H. This course is available for EM credit. GE VPA and historical study and diversity global studies course. VSP Admis Cond course.

Jewish Studies

2700H: The Hebrew Bible in Translation

Class: 26579  Time: Tue/Thu 9:35AM-10:55AM   Location: 2186 Smith Lab  Instructor: Daniel Frank

DESCRIPTION: Creation, expulsion, procreation, murder, natural disaster  — the opening chapters of the Bible tell a tale of universal origins. The narratives that follow relate the story of a chosen individual, then a family, and finally a people. This course introduces the narratives of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) from Genesis through Kings. The stories will be studied from a critical perspective, within their Ancient Near Eastern contexts — social, cultural, and religious. We will also examine the special literary features that make biblical prose so distinctive. Finally, we will look at the ways in which certain stories were understood by later generations.

Fulfills GE Requirements: Literature & Diversity. Global Studies

Prerequisites: None 

Linguistics

3701H: Language and the Mind

Class: 32475  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM - 3:40PM   Location: TBA  Instructor: William Schuler

DESCRIPTION: The course is an introduction to the psychological processes by which humans produce and understand sentences in conversation, the means by which these processes arise in the child, and their bases in the brain. It deals with the following topics (among others): (1) Speech Perception, the process of detecting distinct 'sounds' in speech signals; (2) Lexical Access, the process of 'looking up' words in a mental dictionary; (3) Syntactic Parsing, the process of discovering the structure of sentences; (4) Semantic Interpretation, the process of using syntactic structures, word meaning and general world knowledge to interpret what we hear; (5) Language Acquisition, the process by which a child becomes able to produce and understand sentences of his or her native language(s), (f) Neurolinguistics, the study of the way language functions are implemented in the brain.

GE: Social Science: Individuals and Groups. Cross-listed as Psych 3371

Music

3364E Ethical Conflicts in Health Care Research, Policy, and Practice  

Class: 33853  Time: Mon/Wed 2:20PM-3:40PM   Location: 109 Hughes Hall  Instructor: Ryan Skinner

DESCRIPTION: This course explores the varied relationship between music and politics in the world today. It addresses the essential role music plays in the political lives of individuals, communities and states in a variety of cultures and societies. See syllabus.

Topics covered include:

  • the sounds and sentiments of social activism in the public sphere
  • the value and challenge of cultural advocacy in civil society
  • and the work of partnering with (non)governmental institutions, community organizations, and grassroots affiliates to advance one’s musical art and politics

By taking a comparative, cross-cultural and trans-national perspective, the course considers the myriad ways in which music resounds the arguments, concerns and desires of political communities worldwide.

The course will help students:

  • gain aural and conceptual familiarity with a variety of music cultures from around the world
  • understand the various means by which public culture informs and shapes citizenship in different societies
  • develop basic skills for thinking, conducting research and writing about music, both as sound and in the context of social and political life
  • evaluate the political aspects of their personal and local musical environments
  • discover what music can contribute to social and political engagement in the public sphere, and the world more broadly

GE: Visual and Performing Arts and Global Studies and Diversity (Global Studies)  Open to music majors and non-majors. No previous musical experience required.

Philosophy

3341H Ethical Conflicts in Health Care Research, Policy, and Practice  

Class: 32218  Time: We/Fri 11:10AM-12:30PM   Location: 314 Bolz Hall  Instructor: Dana Howard

DESCRIPTION:  The advances made in medicine over the past century are an impressive collective human achievement. However, not all people have benefited equally from the explosive growth of biomedical technology and some have suffered greatly both in the development and the procurement of medical care. This course offers a philosophical approach to analyzing some key moral dilemmas that have arisen in health care research, policy, and practice. Questions that we will cover in the course involve the ethics of human and animal research, particularly the means we may take toward laudable ends; the nature of addiction and what the ends of medicine should be; and the ethics of health care provision and what sort of society we should aspire to be.

Psychology

1100H: Introduction to Psychology  

See class search for 18 sections of dates/times.

DESCRIPTION:  Psychology 100H is a comprehensive introduction to the science and profession of psychology.  Topics covered include the Biological Bases of Behavior and Cognition, Learning, Memory, Perception, Development, Cognition, Social Behavior and Clinical Psychology. Emphasis is placed upon recent psychological research and theory.  Course assignments include the textbook, readings in the psychological literature, a paper and either research participation or an original observational project.

3310H: Sensation and Perception  

Class: 22022  Time: Mon/Wed/Fri 10:20AM-11:15AM   Location: 353 Journalism Bldg  Instructor: Kristin Supe

DESCRIPTION:  This course will examine how the sensory systems of humans and other animals provide critical information that allows them to perceive and manipulate their environments.  It will focus primarily on hearing and vision, and will include a detailed discussion of the neurophysiological mechanisms that are devoted to these senses. It will also include an overview of the behavioral techniques that have been used to provide much of our current knowledge in this field, and a discussion of how this work has influenced the design of sensory systems for computer vision and robotics, and the development of new technologies to assist patients with sensory impairments. Prereq: Honors standing, and 1100, 1100H, or 1100E. Not open to students with credit for 3310 (310).

3331H: Abnormal Psychology

Class: 21999  Time: Wed/Fri 8:00AM-9:20AM   Location: 018 Enarson Classroom Bldg  Instructor: Leslie Rudy

DESCRIPTION:  This course focuses on the phenomenology (description), etiology (causes), and treatment of abnormal behavior.  Major psychiatric syndromes will be discussed along with our current classification system (DSM-IV).  Genetic, biological, social, and psychological parameters implicated in the etiology of these syndromes will be reviewed.  Prereq: Honors standing, and 1100, 1100H, or 1100E. Prohibited Course = Psych 2367.02

3371H: Language and the Mind

Class: 33705  Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM-3:40PM   Location: TBA  Instructor: William Schuler

DESCRIPTION:  This course provides an introduction to the psychological processes by which humans produce and understand sentences, the means by which these processes arise in the child, and their bases in the mind and brain. The course is an introduction to the psychological processes by which humans produce and understand sentences in conversation, the means by which these processes arise in the child, and their bases in the brain. It deals with the following topics (among others): (a) Speech Perception, the process of detecting distinct 'sounds' in speech signals; (b) Lexical Access, the process of 'looking up' words in a mental dictionary; (c) Syntactic Parsing, the process of discovering the structure of sentences; (d) Semantic Interpretation, the process of using syntactic structures, word meaning and general world knowledge to interpret what we hear; (e) Language Acquisition, the process by which a child becomes able to produce and understand sentences of his or her native language(s); (f) Neurolinguistics, the study of the way language functions are implemented in the brain.  Prereq: Honors standing, and 1100, 1100H, or 1100E.

3550H: Psychology of Childhood  

Class: 22022  Time: Mon/Wed/Fri 10:20AM-11:15AM   Location: 353 Journalism Bldg  Instructor: Kristin Supe

DESCRIPTION:  Psychology of Childhood presents theory and research of psychological development during infancy and early to middle childhood.  Especially designed for Honors Students, it offers, in addition to the readings on substantive topics covered in the regular section of Psychology 3550, supplementary readings in contemporary research and films/video on psychological development.  Guided instruction is provided to help students acquire the following skills:  critique a research article, logically derive hypotheses from a review of research literature, search the psychological databases on line, use the American Psychological Association publication style, and write a review of research that can serve as the introduction to a research proposal.  For students in this course, a reference librarian conducts a workshop on Searching PsycLit on CD-Rom that includes supervised hands-on experience.  Students are evaluated based on their performance in two exams, the review of research paper, and participation in class discussions.  Prereq: Honors standing, and 1100, 1100H, or 1100E.

5613H: – Biological Psychiatry 

Class: 32895 Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM-3:40PM   Location: 115 Psychology Bldg  Instructor: Richard Jagacinski

DESCRIPTION:  Provides a contemporary overview of the biological bases of several significant psychopathologies, including mood disorders, anxiety and stress-based disorders, and schizophrenia. Learning objectives include 1) understand dimensional vs categorical approaches to studying neuropsychiatric phenomenology 2) understand neuronal function, circuitry, and neuroanatomy associated with disorders and their treatment 3) know the strengths and weaknesses of the tools and techniques used in biological psychiatry including animal and human models, neuroimaging, neurophysiology, genetics/epigenetics, neuropharmacology.  Prereq: Honors standing, and Psych 2220 and 2300, and either 3313 or 3513.

5700H – Training in Science Education Outreach:  The "COSI Course"   

Class: 22036 Time: Wed 2:00PM-4:45PM   Location: 030 Hitchcock Hall  Instructor: Laura Wagner

DESCRIPTION:  This course provides hands-on training in science education at the Center of Science and Industry.  Students will work at the Language Sciences Research Lab a working linguistics lab inside the museum.  Students will learn about linguistics research and be trained in how to communicate language sciences information to the public, including child and adult visitors.  More info here.

Students will spend 3 - 6 hours per week at COSI, explaining the language research to visitors, conducting demonstrations about language science, and assisting in recruitment for the research studies. These COSI hours will replace some regularly scheduled classes and will be scheduled at various times in consultation with students and will include some evening and weekend hours.

Sociology

1101H: Introduction to Sociology

Class: 20932 Time: Tue/Thu 11:10AM-12:30PM   Location: 243 Campbell  Instructor: Korie Edwards

Class: 20933 Time: Wed/Fri 2:20PM-3:40PM   Location: 304 Journalism Bldg  Instructor: TBA

Class: 20934 Time: Wed/Fri 9:35AM-10:55AM   Location: 148 Baker Systems  Instructor: Douglas Downey

DESCRIPTION:  A study of the art and profession of theatre, with an emphasis on evaluating and appreciating live performance, theatre's cultural importance, and its relationship to issues of social diversity. Students study performance conventions, texts, & spaces from ancient times to present day. While not an acting class, students get firsthand experience in the collaborative process of theatre creation. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 2100H or 2101H. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.

2367.01H:  The Political Elite and Interest Groups   

Class: 27275 Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM-3:40PM   Location: 148 Baker Systems  Instructor: TBA

DESCRIPTION:  Sociological analysis of American politics and society, emphasizing political elites and interest groups, and the changing role of the state in the economy.  Prereq: Honors standing, and English 1110 (110), 1111, or 111, or equivalent; or permission of department or instructor. Not open to students with credit for 367.01H. GE writing and comm: level 2 and soc sci orgs and polities course.

Spanish

3403H: Intermediate Spanish Composition

Class: 28855 Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM   Location: 045 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: Jill Welch

DESCRIPTION:  Students in Spanish 3403H (Honors Intermediate Spanish Composition) work toward a professional-quality final portfolio featuring the following genres: literary essay, self-portrait, argumentative essay, interview feature article, and short story. During the short-story concentration, students in the Honors section collaborate with Spanish-speaking children in Columbus City Schools as part of our literacy outreach initiative, which culminates in publishing bilingual storybooks for the children. Students in Spanish 3403H have also had course compositions published in the University magazine ¿Qué pasa? OHIO STATE.

3450H: Introduction to the Study of Literature and Culture in Spanish: Reading Texts  

Class: 20633 Time: Wed/Fri 9:35AM-10:55AM   Location: 062 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: Rebecca Haidt

Class: 28374 Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM   Location: 056 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: Paloma Martinez-Cruz

DESCRIPTION:  This class serves as an introduction to the various issues involved in reading different types (genres) of literary and cultural texts in the Spanish language, and represents a crucial link between courses in language and culture and upper-level courses in literatures and cultures. Students will acquire the fundamental critical techniques needed for the analysis of literary and cultural texts, particularly narrative (short story and novel), poetry, drama, and film. 

4430H: Honors Introduction to Spanish Linguistics 

Class: 28338 Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM - 3:40PM   Location: 056 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: John Grinstead

DESCRIPTION:  This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish. Linguistics is the scientific study of human language; and as such, it looks for answers to the following questions: what do you know when you know a language? and why are human languages the way they are? The first part of the course introduces concepts and techniques of the analysis of sentence structure (syntax), sounds (phonology and phonetics), and word formation (morphology) in Spanish. The course will then examine other aspects of language including Pragmatics, Sociolinguistics, Child and L2 Language Acquisition, Bilingualism and Language in special populations, such as children with specific language impairment or who are on the Autism Spectrum. To illustrate these aspects of language in a concrete way, the class will have the project of constructing pieces of a new variety of Spanish, "Columbeño", over the course of the quarter.

4551E: Spanish Golden Age Literature

Class: 28345 Time: Tue/Thu 11:10AM - 12:30PM   Location: 045 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: Elizabeth Davis

DESCRIPTION:  This course introduces students to literature of the Spanish early modern period (sixteenth and seventeenth centuries) through a selection of representative texts: a short picaresque novel, a sampling of Renaissance poems, a “Moorish” novel, two great examplars of the Spanish theater of the times (one of them by Lope de Vega, “our” Shakespeare), and a short fiction piece by Miguel de Cervantes. Pre-req: 3450. Students who have not had Spanish 3450 or its equivalent will not be admitted to the course. The reading for this class is challenging, so be sure to allow plenty of reading/preparation time for this class. Class attendance and participation are fundamental requirements; each student will be expected to participate in every session. Absences and failure to participate will result in the student’s grade being lowered (details on syllabus). SPAN 4551-E is conducted entirely in Spanish, however some critical essays in English are included. The primary emphasis of the course is the development of active critical skills through in-class discussion and written analysis of the literary text. We will also view a few films based on our primary texts or on the historical context of this Spanish “Golden Age.”

Students taking this course for Honors credit will meet two additional times during the quarter. To set up these meeting times, please indicate all free times you have on Mondays and Fridays in an email to the professor by the end of the first week of classes. Honors students will read an additional text by Miguel de Cervantes, and one additional dramatic text: La vida es sueño, by Pedro Calderón de la Barca. Finally, students taking this course for Honors credit will write a lengthier term paper that involves substantial research (approx. 10 pages, double spaced; at least 12 bibliographic items in the “Works Cited,” of which no more than 4 may be citations from Internet sources). Paper topics should be discussed with the professor, during office hours, beginning the third week of classes. Feel free to approach the professor if you have questions about these requirements.

4565H: Latin American Indigenous Literatures and Cultures

Class: 32825 Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM   Location: 159 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: Michelle WIbbelsman

DESCRIPTION: This course explores indigenous cultures throughout Latin America in historical, geographical, social and political context. We begin with a general overview of Latin America and a collage of images of indigenous peoples in this part of the world accompanied by reflections in their own words about their realities, struggles, celebrations and cultural expression. The first part of the course focuses on pre Hispanic civilizations, namely the Inka, Maya and Aztec empires, up to the point of the European Conquest or Colonial Encounter. The second part of the course centers on contemporary indigenous communities in the context of Latin American nation-states and considers processes of continuity and change in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  In our efforts to understand more about indigenous peoples of Latin American, along with both their uniqueness and the diversity they represent, we will include topics on indigenous oral traditions, literatures, ritual practices, myths, religions, musical production and performances, social relations, politics, and other forms of expressive culture.  We will explore the extraordinary cultural combinations that emerge from Latin America’s tripartite indigenous, Iberian and African heritage. Important concepts and themes we will introduce and discuss throughout the semester include indigenous cosmovision, syncretism, hegemony, cultural reification, ethnogenesis, identity politics, ethnic resistance and revitalization, transnationalism, globalization, migration, diaspora, cosmopolitanism, cultural continuity and social transformation.

For students interested in pursuing further work on Latin America, this course will provide an introduction to useful terms and concepts applicable to continuing coursework across a range of disciplines. For all students this course offers a glimpse at the broad spectrum of human societies and fosters a comparative and critical awareness of other societies, of our own, and of the complex connections and histories that link us together.

4567H: Spanish Mosaic: Catalonia, Basque Country, Galicia and Andalusia

Class: 32822 Time: Wed/Fri 9:35AM-10:55AM    Location: 259 Hagerty Hall  Instructor: Eugenia Romero

DESCRIPTION:  This course seeks to explore, through different lenses, the fragmentation and renegotiation of Spanish cultural and political identity in tension with its peripheral “nations.”  Since 1978, when the Spanish Constitution granted the status of “national historic communities” to Catalonia, the Basque Country, Galicia, and Andalusia, the idea of a homogeneous nation has been constantly challenged by the cultural and literary practices of each individual region. Through careful readings of selected texts, films, songs and other cultural materials, we will approach the struggle of the “peripheral nations” to define their own identities by creating ethnocentric myths, vindicating their national languages, emphasizing popular traditions, etc. We will explore how literature, music, mass media, and other cultural representations (i.e. internet sites, tv shows, comics, etc.), as tools, work in the construction of these national imaginaries. It is expected that each student will take a critical position about the difficulties that arise when talking about: 1) ONE Spanish nation (as it was emphasized during the Franco dictatorship), and 2) PERIPHERAL national identities. This course will examine a variety of texts (short stories, novels, films, music, and web pages, etc.) that best represent the continuous resistance to an “imposed” Spanish nationhood. Background readings on nation-formation theories and Spanish history as well as information on each region’s nationalist movements will be provided. In particular, we will examine the images of the nation represented in the cultural production of these regions. In our discussions, we will consider a series of key questions such as: What makes a nation? What elements constitute a national sentiment? How are these elements represented in literature and culture? Why do we speak of a fragmented Spain? Where do these authors position themselves in relation to these problems?

Statistics

1430H: Statistics for the Business Sciences

Class: 20092 Time: Tue/Thu 12:40PM-1:35PM    Location: 240 Enarson Classroom Bldg  Instructor: Deborah Rumsey-Johnson

Class: 20093 Time: Mon/Wed 11:30AM-12:25PM    Location: 014 Enarson Classroom Bldg  Instructor: TBA

DESCRIPTION: Statistics 1430H is a calculus-based introduction to probability and statistics, sample statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions, and sampling distributions for means and proportions, with a special focus on the methodology that underlies the techniques and analyses. This is a GEC course for Data Analysis. The expected overall learning outcomes are: Students understand basic concepts of statistics and probability, comprehend methods needed to analyze and critically evaluate statistical arguments, and recognize the importance of statistical ideas. More information can be found here.

Theatre

2100H: Introduction to Theatre

Class: 19791 Time: Wed/Fri 9:35AM-10:55AM    Location: 119 Campbell Hall  Instructor: Karen Mozingo

Class: 19873 Time: Wed/Fri 11:10AM-12:30PM    Location: 119 Campbell Hall  Instructor: Karen Mozingo

Class: 19876 Time: Tue/Thu 12:45PM-2:05PM    Location: 2068 Drake Center  Instructor: Stratos Constantinidis

Class: 19959 Time: Tue/Thu 2:20PM-3:40PM    Location: 015 Enarson Classroom Bldgr  Instructor: J Cormier

DESCRIPTION:  A study of the art and profession of theatre, with an emphasis on evaluating and appreciating live performance, theatre's cultural importance, and its relationship to issues of social diversity. Students study performance conventions, texts, & spaces from ancient times to present day. While not an acting class, students get firsthand experience in the collaborative process of theatre creation. Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 2100H or 2101H. GE VPA and diversity soc div in the US course.

2341H: Moving Image Art 

Class: 33212 Time: Wed/Fri 9:35AM-10:55PM    Location: 2060 Drake Center  Instructor: Michael Kaplan

DESCRIPTION:  The issues and concepts fundamental to the development of an understanding of the aesthetics of film and video from the standpoint of the producer and maker. Prereq: Honors standing or by permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 230H. GE VPA course.